Générer des bitcoins - Bitcoin.fr

What is Blockchain Technology?

What is Blockchain Technology?
The original article appeared here: https://www.securities.io/what-is-blockchain-technology/
Its been almost ten years since Satoshi Nakamoto first introduced Blockchain technology to the world in his 2008 Bitcoin Whitepaper. Since that time, these revolutionary networks have gained popularity in both the corporate and governmental sectors. This growth is easily explained when you consider that blockchain technology provides the world with some unique advantages that were previously unimaginable. Consequently, today, you can find blockchain technology in nearly every sector of the global economy.

What is Blockchain Technology?

A blockchain is a network of computers that share a distributed ledger across all network participants (nodes). This strategy is far different than say, fiat currencies that originate from a centralized authority figure. Importantly, this ledger keeps an unbroken chain of transactions since the birth of the network. This “chain” of transactions grows larger as new “blocks” of transactions are approved and added to it.
Bitcoin Whitepaper
In order to approve new transactions, each node works together with others to validate new blocks. Additionally, the nodes also validate the current state of the entire blockchain. In order for a new block of transactions to be added to the blockchain, they must receive approval from 51% of the network’s nodes. Nodes are also referred to as miners. In this manner, blockchain networks are decentralized networks that provide unmatched security to the world of digital assets.

Security via Decentralization

Decentralization is an important aspect of blockchain technology because it makes these revolutionary ledgers immutable and unalterable. In fact, since there is no centralized attack vector, hacking a blockchain is nearly impossible. The larger the blockchain network, the more secure the data on it remains.
For example, let’s look at the world’s largest blockchain, Bitcoin. Currently, the Bitcoin blockchain has over 10,000 active nodes located across the globe. This distribution means that in order for an attacker to alter even just one tiny piece of information on the blockchain, they would need to successfully hack 5,000+ computers at once.
While this task may not be impossible for the quantum computers of the future, it’s so unprofitable that it makes no sense to even attempt such a monumental task. Additionally, on top of successfully hacking 5000+ computers at once, an attacker would also need a supercomputer to recalculate the new blockchain transactions in time to introduce them into the network. It would literally be more affordable to create a new cryptocurrency from scratch.

Consensus Mechanisms

One of the reasons why blockchain networks are so secure is the integration of consensus mechanisms. Consensus mechanisms are cryptographic protocols that leverage the participants of a blockchain network in securing its data. In the case of Bitcoin, the Proof-of-Work (PoW) consensus mechanism is used.

Proof-of-Work (PoW)

The Proof-of-Work consensus mechanism was revolutionary to the world of cryptography when it was first introduced years prior by Adam Back in his Hashcash whitepaper. In the concept, Back describes the integration of a mathematical equation to the network’s security protocols. In this way, every computer can show “proof” of their work securing the network.

Miner Rewards

It’s important to understand that nodes receive a reward for their mining efforts. These rewards adjust automatically depending on the network’s difficulty and value. In the case of Bitcoin, miners originally received 50 Bitcoin for their efforts. Today, this seems like fortune, but back in 2009, Bitcoin was only worth pennies. As the value of the token rises and the network goes, the mining rewards shrink. Today, Bitcoin miners receive 6.5 BTC if they add the next block to the chain.

SHA-256

Notably, every node validates and secures the blockchain, but only one gets to add the next block of transactions to the network. To determine who the next miner is that gets to add this block, every computer competes in a mathematical race to figure out the PoW equation. In the case of Bitcoin, the equation is known as SHA-256. Importantly, the first SHA algorithm dates back to Hashcash. This early version of the equation was known as SHA-1.
Notably, the SHA-256 equation is so difficult that it’s easier and more efficient for your computer to just make random guesses rather than attempting to figure out the equation directly. The answer to the equation must begin with a predetermined amount of 0s. In the Bitcoin blockchain, the equation’s answer must start with four zeros. However, if the network’s congestion rises, so does the difficulty of these equations. This difficulty adjusts by the addition of another zero at the beginning of the required SHA-256 answer.
Similarly to traditional commodities such as gold, there are costs that are associated with the creation and introduction of these digital assets into the market. These random guesses utilize intense computational power. This power equates to real-world costs such as electricity bills. Studies have shown that securing the Bitcoin network can use more electricity than required by entire countries. Luckily, over 80% of Bitcoin’s power consumption comes from renewable sources such as solar or hydroelectric. This cost of mining also adds measurable value to each Bitcoin.

Miners

As Bitcoin began to gain in profitability, its network’s computing power expanded significantly. In the beginning, nodes, also known as miners, could mine for Bitcoin using nothing more than your home PC. Eventually, miners realized that graphic cards were far better at the repetitive guessing required to figure out the SHA-256 algorithm. This led to a computational race in the market.

ASIC

Eventually, large blockchain firms such as Bitmain introduced Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) miners into the equation. These purpose-built miners were thousands of times more efficient at guessing the SHA-256 algorithm than the GPUs and CPUs before them. Consequently, their introduction created a scenario in which the average miner now needed to invest thousands in mining equipment to stay relevant.

Mining Pools

Luckily, some creative minds in the field began to think of ways to level the playing field out again. They developed “mining pools.” A mining pool is a network of miners that all share computational power for the common goal of mining blockchain transactions. Importantly, mining pool participants receive a percentage of the reward based on their contributions to the network’s overall hash (computational power).
Importantly, over the last three years, there has been a push to move away from power-hungry consensus mechanisms such as PoW. This desire to secure blockchains in a more efficient manner has led to the development of some truly unique consensus mechanisms in the sector.

Proof-of-Stake (PoS)

The Proof-of-Stake mechanism does away with the difficult mathematical algorithms and instead utilizes a more psychological approach to securing the network. In a PoS blockchain, users don’t need to compete mathematically to add the next block to the blockchain. Instead, PoS users “stake” their coins via network wallets to secure the network. The way staking works is simple.
Keeping a certain amount of coins in your wallet allows you to participate in transaction validations. The more coins you stake, the more likely the chances are you get to add the next block of transactions to the network. In most PoS systems, a miner from those with the most tokens staked at the time receives the chance to add the blocks.
The advantages of a PoS consensus mechanism are immediately evident. For one, you don’t need to pour tons of resources into your network to keep it safe. Additionally, since nodes are chosen based on their amount of staked coins, there is never a scenario in which a node gains anything from validating incorrect transactions. Basically, a hacker would have to fully invest in the cryptocurrency prior to attacking the network. In this way, PoS systems create a huge deterrent to attackers.

The Future of Blockchain Technology

Blockchain technology has come a long way from its early days as a means to secure cryptocurrency networks. Today, blockchain technology has numerous uses across every type of industry imaginable. Specifically, blockchain programs have impacted the logistical, financial, and data security sectors in a major way.

Blockchain Technology Logistics

Blockchain logistical systems are more efficient and cost-effective to operate than traditional paper-based models. In fact, the immutable and unalterable nature of blockchain tech makes it ideally suited to logistical tasks. Soon, you may be able to ascertain much more information regarding the creation and delivery of your products thanks to these new-age systems emerging.

Fundraising

Blockchain technology has also altered the way in which businesses raise funds. In a traditional corporate crowdfunding strategy such as an IPO, companies must balance between cost-effectiveness and participation. The inability to process smaller transactions meant that for the longest time, companies had to turn away potential investors. Nowadays, blockchain technology enables businesses to easily automate these procedures via smart contracts.

Smart Contracts

Smart Contracts feature preprogrammed protocols that execute when they receive a certain amount of cryptocurrency sent to their address. These contracts live on the blockchain and enable remarkable functionality. For example, in the case of fundraising, a smart contract can automate processes such as the approval of investors and the distribution of funds.

Blockchain Technology Today

You can expect to see further expansion of the blockchain sector in the coming months as more governments and institutions explore its benefits. For now, the blockchain revolution is well underway.
submitted by BlockDotCo to u/BlockDotCo [link] [comments]

miner du bitcoin TOUT LE MONDE peut le faire sans rien faire

Bonjour tout le monde, en cette période de pandémie où la paresse et l'ennuie règnent, je vous propose un outil pour miner des BITCOINS hyper facilement et gagner de l'argent. Cet outil est tout simplement un moteur de recherche, disponible sur téléphone et pc https://cryptotabbrowser.com/13371482
il vous suffit juste de cliquer sur le lien, vous connectez votre compte Facebook ou google (c'est préférable) et voila le tour est joué. Vous activez le minage et c'est bon vous commencez à gagner des bitcoins.
Le lien que je vous donne est affilié à mon compte donc nous allons créer une immense pool de minage totalement gratuite et profitable pour vous. vous allez être la première ligne, mes filleuls directs mais vous devez aussi donner votre propre lien d'affiliation à vos amis car vous gagnerez vous aussi 10 pourcents des revenus de vos amis. Mais aussi VOUS gagnerez aussi un pourcentage sur le revenu des amis de vos amis...et les amis des amis des amis de vos amis vous feront gagner de l'argent.
Recréons le monde ! JE COMPTE SUR VOUS
Bonne journée ^^
je répondrai à vos questions à tout moment!!!
#cryptotab #money #bitcoin #quarantaine
submitted by spyvox1408 to u/spyvox1408 [link] [comments]

Revolutions always take more time than you think

I am sad to see the price of bitcoin decline for over a year already. Nevertheless, I feel lucky to have the privilege to witness a third technological revolution in my life so far. But why do they always go so slow? And the funny thing is, once they have unfolded, they seemed to have gone very fast. Let me elaborate on the other two revolutions.
When I was 17 years old, my school was keen to set up a "personal computer programming class". In the few years before, computers had become smaller and cheaper. So cheap, that someone could afford a very simple computer for his very own. Those became known as Personal Computers or PC. I enrolled into the class, curious as I was about technical stuff, and I didn't need much time to recognize the mind blowing potential these PCs could have. Half a year later, I decided not to go study astronomy, my then passion, but computer science instead. In retrospect, that was a good career choice, as 30 years later everybody is walking around with a PC in his pocket (nowadays called a smartphone).
The second revolution was the Internet. Note, actually there are two parts to this one, the actual Internet and its biggest killer application so far, the World Wide Web (WWW). When most people talk about the Internet, they actually mean the WWW. You could even argue they should be considered separately, but the Internet had the promise of the WWW already clearly embedded in it.
The first time I got to know the Internet was in the days of cold nuclear fusion in 1989 (remember that?). As a student I worked as an assistant, and in our break room cold fusion was a hot topic. There was one person who had access to "the" Internet, and he always had the latest news that mortals like me had to read in the newspaper two days later. One year later I started my PhD and got access to the Internet on a daily basis, complete with my own shiny email address. Now the revolution engulfed me. Those were the days of telnet, ftp, mail, archie, and Usenet. I will never forget searching for a certain file with archie (a search tool for files on other computers), to find the needed file on a computer in Australia. The pure extacy of entering that computer at the other side of our planet, and sending that file on the fly to my own computer was exhilarating.
A few years later the first internet service provider (aptly called xs4all, they are still in business) started in the Netherlands. Now, you could access the Internet from home! I bought a modem, and now I could do everything from home that I could do at work. Like emailing. Some people had to laugh about that. Me, writing an email while connected by phone to Amsterdam. It wasn't cheap. It was fragile (if the connection dropped, my text was lost). Skeptics said, why not send a fax? Who has an email address? Why not simply call? And of course, they were right. But the Internet could do so much more in potential! It surely would get more practical and user-friendly, I thought. And it did.
In 1994 something new appeared. Mosaic, a program that allowed viewing of pages with texts and images that were on a different computer. This was the start of the World Wide Web, and in a matter of a few years many existing services like ftp, archie and Usenet would move to the WWW. It made the Internet truly user-friendly. This is gonna be big, I thought. I once put up my PC on a party for my friends to try the WWW. I got excited the very first time I saw a web address written on a truck. And I ended up working for a company that develops web-applications.
Late October 2013, I looked into Bitcoin seriously for the first time. I had heard about it one or two years before, but didn't pay attention. Now I did, and suddenly realized THIS is gonna be big. Why? The Internet has made information and software globally distributed and yet, instantly available. But one piece of the puzzle was still missing. Trust. If you exchange value with an anonymous party, you need a trusted third party in between. If you buy a book in your local bookstore, and pay with cash, no trust is needed. Because you swap the cash for the book there and then. But if you buy a book at Amazon, you need a third party that trusts both Amazon and you, so that Amazon and you don't need to trust each other. In this example, this third party is a credit card company.
It also works with other things, like property rights, for which both parties put trust in a notary (which is licensed by the government). Or for money itself. Money is basically a claim you have to future resources. We trust our Central Bank to make sure our money doesn't lose its value too fast. And the government trusts the Central Bank that it doesn't gain value. Because if it does, their debts increase in value, making it harder to pay them back. (That's the main reason for the scaremongering about possible deflation, BTW.)
And now there is Bitcoin, where there is no trust in one single entity. Instead, trust is distributed across the network. A truly revolutionary concept! And the strength of the Bitcoin network keeps growing. In 2014 it became no less than 40 times stronger. So while the price of bitcoin went down by two thirds, the Bitcoin network grew enormously. Remarkable how different groups of people, Bitcoin processors (aka 'miners') and speculators, can have such divergent expectations. Also the software developers have been working like crazy to improve Bitcoin applications, entrepreneurs are busy creating new Bitcoin services, and venture capitalists are pouring millions into startups.
The genie is out of the bottle, the revolution will run its course. And when its done, we'll all say how fast things change...
submitted by AndreKoster to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Monero mining, the road to hell.

You know it started out innocent enough. One friend at work started talking innocently about Monero and before I knew it I had hooked the work PC up to Minergate and had started mining. After I day I saw Moneros slowly ticking in and felt that it needed to go faster, so I downloaded the client as well on my gaming PC at home, but I wasn't able to use the graphic card, the Moneros were still ticking in at a too slow rate.
I did some more reading and found out that Minergate was the devil, that the way to go about this was to set up my own wallet and mine using a client, directly toward a pool. First I created a web-wallet, but then I remember MtGox and all the trouble with bitcoins being lost, so I created a shell wallet on my file server at home and downloaded a few clients, compiled, compared, tuned and after a while I started to see some real Monero dripping in. I managed to get the NVidia miner up on my gaming rig with the juicy 980Ti card and that really made the difference, but I wanted more.
I work with grid solutions/high performance computing and at work we have a lab where I can basically set up whatever equipment that I want (within reason) and latch on to work's power grid. I decided to set up a dual GPU system and just leave it running in the lab area where we have the consoles and do general close proximity work to make things work in the real lab. I did not have a casing so I ordered everything I needed and after some troubleshooting (BIOS did not support the Kaby Lake CPU) I got things up and running on 2xRX480 cards, nicely hashing in on about 630H/s on each card.
In the mean time, to maximize my Monero flow I had turned every device, work and private into CPU and GPU miners, every clock tick squeezed for maximum utilization and at one point I even ran clients on useless Raspberry PIs, slow file servers and Beagle Bone Internet of Things cards, yielding no more than 3-6 H/s. It all added up, but I still needed more.
I started looking into building a real mining rig. I ordered an AMD Motherboard, more PSUs, CPU, RAM, USB risers, etc. and I got a rig frame flown in from China at a reasonable price. In the meantime I had already ordered another RX480 which were idling on my work desk while I was building the rig. The rig was being set up at my work desk, sitting next to my work PC which also was mining Monero at full capacity when I wasn't at work. GPU mining needs to be off if the system is to be used without severe graphics lag.
I had installed 2 GPU clients on my home system as well, one that really bogged down the system, rendering it unusable for anything except mining, the other setting I could easily do other work, web-browsing and such without too much lag from the graphic cards. Whenever I left for work or went to sleep I put the heavy load version on, and when I got home from work or woke up in the morning, my living room was warm and cozy, at least 4-5'C above the usual.
By now I had gathered 5 GPUs which had completely filled up my mining rig. Achievement unlocked! Although I still had some debugging work to do on it (random crashes) it still would run smoothly most of the time. The Monero is pouring in, about $10 USD worth of Monero each day, from both my rig and the myriad of fileservers, gaming and work PCs, and stupid little devices that were designed for completely different things. The value of Monero had increased from about $12 USD to $30 USD during this time, everything was with a promising outlook.
Then, yesterday it occurred to me, I did move 2 cards from the first PC that I bought, to the mining rig, which means that I could get two new cards and put into that one. So, I have just ordered myself two more RX480 (which by the way are much nicer for Monero mining than the RX580s) and as I am sitting here, having just ordered those cards, I am already planning the next step, moving the first motherboard out of the PC and latch it on to a rig and connect 2 more cards (it's a mATX motherboard with 4 PCI-e slots)
But now, I am wondering, where will this all end? Have I become a Monero mining addict? How many rigs and graphic cards do I need to finally feel satisfied? When do I get enough? And will this short term bankrupt me completely? Well, at least I am not using money on booze, drugs or hookers, but it still feels like an addiction.
Any words of advice or comfort appreciated...
submitted by bloodwire to MoneroMining [link] [comments]

Battle Over Bitcoin: China Backs US Startup Coinbase And US Falls Behind In Virtual Currencies.

Indeed, virtual currencies are nothing new to the Chinese. For example, more than 100 million people on the social platform QQ have used the Q coin for more than 10 years. And after China’s state-run China Central Television, or CCTV, ran a half-hour-long documentary on bitcoins, downloads of apps for processing and “mining” bitcoins soared in the world’s second largest economy.
Bitcoin, long the plaything of the Western ubernerd, now appears poised to grow substantially in China and other markets, like the euro zone, where government meddling in native currency valuations has left many distrustful of the money in their bank accounts.
Americans don’t have this problem -- yet. And that may be a problem in itself. According to bitcoin proponents, if the U.S. tries to ignore the nascent currency, writing it off as a financial fad with less value than the seemingly stable dollar, Americans risk ceding to the Chinese and others control of the future of what could be the most disruptive force in monetary exchanges since the credit card. In turn, the dollar and the ability of the U.S. to navigate global currency conflicts could be seriously weakened.
“Here’s the bottom line: Bitcoin has much higher popularity outside the U.S. and much higher potential outside the U.S.,” observed Andreas M. Antonopoulos of the Bitcoin Foundation. “If you go to an American and say, ‘Hey, there’s this new thing, bitcoin,’ they say, ‘Well, what’s wrong with the dollar?’ That question is different in other countries.”
Bitcoins are a finite, Web-based currency created in 2009 by a group of hackers working under the nom-de-Internet Satoshi Nakamoto. Exactly 10,952,975 bitcoins are in circulation, all of which have been purchased on exchange networks or mined. The currency is mined using software that processes transactions on the bitcoin network, adding groups of transactions, called blocks, to the chain. Miners are paid about 25 bitcoins per block. That digital money can then be used to purchase a variety of goods online, from legitimate software to heroin on the infamous virtual black-market Silk Road.
Bitcoin surged in value to $266 last month, thrusting the currency into the mainstream spotlight as investment poured in from sources as diverse as the hapless Brothers Winklevoss (of Facebook infamy) and Union Capital Ventures principal Fred Wilson (an early investor in Zynga, Twitter, and Kickstarter). Suddenly, everyone was talking about buying bitcoins. But the bubble burst in late April, and in the U.S. at least, bitcoin faded from the news. That was not the case in China, where Antonopoulos said downloads of bitcoin clients have eclipsed those in the U.S.
Bitcoins are mined in several steps. After downloading a bitcoin client, such as Coinbase (which serves as a wallet in which to store the bits of code that constitute the digital money), miners often join pools where they share computing power to decode algorithms in which bitcoins are hidden. The concept of bitcoins and bitcoin mining is cryptic for many people, even some otherwise forward-thinking American investors. The irony is that, for now, American startups are leading the bitcoin charge, and the U.S. government was the first to issue guidance on using the currency as payment -- a seemingly tacit recognition of bitcoin’s validity as legal tender.
Why China Poses A Threat
Feng Li, the IDG partner who chose to fund Coinbase, said the Chinese have yearned for access to a virtual currency since the central government cracked down on the use of Q coins.
Q coins were introduced in March 2002 by Tencent Holdings Ltd. (HKG:0700), the parent company of the country’s most popular instant-messaging service, QQ , and they currently average an annual transaction value of more than 1 billion yuan ($163 million). That value is growing at about 15 to 25 percent each year.
Q coins, purchased with yuan, are predominantly used to buy virtual products and services in QQ and its related online games and social media. Originally, Tencent regulations prevented Q coins from being traded between users or converted back to yuan, but allowed users to trade points and purchase Q coins with their game accounts, then use the black market to convert them into cash. That caused concerns at the People’s Bank of China, China’s central bank. In January 2007, converting game points to Q coins was banned, and Tencent reiterated that Q coins constitute a product, not a currency, which seemed to satisfy the concerns.
“There has already been proof with the Q coin,” Feng said of the Chinese likeliness to start using bitcoin. “It’s been very well circulated and very well adopted.”
Already, shops on Taobao -- the Chinese equivalent to eBay Inc. (NASDAQ:EBAY), owned by Alibaba.com Ltd. (HKG:1688) -- accept bitcoins as payment for goods, as does the similar service, Tencent’s PaiPai.com.
The Chinese are embracing bitcoins in other ways. The first bitcoin fund began to raise money in June, with the goal of raising 20 million yuan. The fund’s investment threshold is 10,000 yuan, and it will mature in four years.
Q coin’s popularity isn’t the only reason bitcoin has appeal in China. As it turns out, China is the perfect place for bitcoin mining. While much of the developed world is well into the transition from personal computers to mobile devices, China’s PC market is still thriving, which provides the necessary computing power to run a successful business converting electricity into mined coins. Price caps on electricity already create wasteful use of energy in China, so running a code-crunching computer for hours on end isn’t as costly an investment as it would be in the U.S. And so-called “gold-mining” or “gold-farming” businesses already exist in China’s cybersphere. None of that will come as a surprise to any “World of Warcraft” player: Gamers in Chinese urban sweatshops are known to sit in front of glowing blue screens for hours, slaughtering players in the game for their spoils or mining gold deposits found in the sprawling milieu of Blizzard Entertainment’s international blockbuster. Those treasures are then sold to players in the game for real money.
China has a heavily controlled currency, which also makes bitcoin attractive.
“The more controlled the currency is, the harder the transactions are, the more friction there is in the national currency, the more appealing the coin is,” Antonopoulos said, noted that the most appealing place to use bitcoin would be a country whose economy is a veritable train wreck -- like Zimbabwe, except that the southern African nation lacks the necessary technology. “I would say China is perfect,” he said. “It’s got the penetration, it’s got the smartphones, it’s got the Internet and the people are familiar with virtual currencies. And, it’s got the not-as-appealing national currency.”
Regulation In The U.S.
Guidance issued in March by the U.S. Treasury Department said that companies issuing or exchanging online cash, including bitcoin, would be subject to the same scrutiny as traditional firms such as the Western Union Co. (NYSE:WU) to prevent money laundering.
Less than two months later, the Department of Homeland Security proved that edict had teeth.
Federal officials obtained a warrant Tuesday to seize an account tied to Mt.Gox, the Tokyo-based exchange company that handles about 80 percent of all bitcoin trades. Authorities accused Mt.Gox’s U.S. subsidiary, Mutum Sigillum LLC, of failing to register as a money-services company with the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. An account held by the online-payments firm Dwolla was subsequently seized.
Many feared the warrant execution could cast a chill over the bitcoin industry as a sector centered on a borderless, decentralized money came under the scrutiny of the federal government.
That proved not to be the case, Coinbase’s Ehrsam said. “For bitcoin to go mainstream, or as it goes mainstream, it will be used in a higher and higher amount of transactions,” he said, adding that Coinbase is registered as a money-services firm. “There’s no way there will be all this money flowing through an unregulated system.”
Chris Larsen -- the CEO of OpenCoin, a fellow San Francisco-based payment platform that processes most national currencies as well as bitcoin and its own virtual cash, Ripple -- agreed. “They definitely are regulating them, [and] we actually think that’s a really good thing for the industry,” he told IBTimes. “I thought the guidance was a good idea. One of the things the guidelines seem to make clear for the first time is that a virtual currency could be used for goods and services.”
The Price Of Regulation
But such regulation is a slippery slope, said Jerry Brito, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.
Perhaps it begins with measures to prevent money-laundering, he said. But what measures would the government take to prevent the untraceable currency from being used for child pornography or human trafficking?
“Bitcoin has the potential to be a disruptive technology that would be beneficial to the economy, and we don’t want to kill off that potential to get at the other potential for bad stuff,” he observed. Brito, who plans to speak next month at a conference on virtual currencies organized by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, added: “We’re already the first country to enforce money-laundering laws against bitcoin. But the U.S. would be shooting itself in the foot if it went too far [with regulations] and either outlawed bitcoin or made the legal guidelines impossible to comply with.”
Will China Step In?
So far, Chinese bitcoin merchants have little to fear. For many, the CCTV segment on bitcoin seemed to be a signal from Beijing, which heavily controls the channel’s content, that the currency is worth exploring.
Some of those interviewed speculated that the Communist Party wants to see bitcoin stockpiled in China, allowing the government to invest in it if, or when, the dollar is shaken from its perch as the world’s reserve currency.
It remains to be seen whether -- or, more likely, when -- China will intervene in the trade of bitcoin in its own economy. But for the U.S. to experience widespread adoption of the currency, which is considered a necessary step for gaining a grasp on the bitcoin market, limited government control will have to allow the money, like the Internet that birthed it, to develop organically.
submitted by kazzZZY to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Comment miner du Bitctoin avec son pc ? [FR] Quel config pour commencer à miner ![Valable en 2019] Miner du bitcoin sur son pc facilement - YouTube JE GAGNE DE L'ARGENT GRACE AU BITCOIN ! (Mining) - YouTube How To Mine 1 Bitcoin in 10 Minutes - Blockchain BTC Miner ...

Le minage de crypto monnaie est un business rentable. Mais il faut un ordinateur puissant pour ce faire. Des internautes revendent leur hardware d’occasion sur le net avec des petites ... Meilleur ordinateur pour l'exploitation minière bitcoin. La route de la crypto-monnaie minière n'est pas particulièrement compliquée, même si elle peut parfois être accablante. Tout d'abord, établissons ce qu'un ordinateur de bureau avec une puissante carte graphique vous permettra de faire. Fast Bitcoin miner for Laptop. With one button your can start mining bitcoins! Easy bitcoin address setup. Every 4-5 days you can withdraw your mined bitcoins. No fees! Get massive hashing power for mining Bitcoin from your own pc with our unique algorithm. Approximately after 4-5 days you mining 0.005 BTC. Bitcoin mining hardware handles the actual Bitcoin mining process, but: Bitcoin mining software is equally as important. If you are a solo miner: the mining software connects your Bitcoin miner to the blockchain. If you mine with a pool: the software will connect you to your mining pool. If you are cloud mining: you do not need mining software. Bien que l’activité qui consiste à miner des bitcoin se soit professionnalisé au point qu’il faille se procurer du matériel très cher ( Asic miner ) pour pouvoir espérer en tirer un gros bénéfice.Il existe néanmoins des solutions accessibles pour les particuliers qui peuvent permettre ( selon les performances de son ordinateur ) d’obtenir des bitcoin par le procédé du minage.

[index] [31274] [43369] [34969] [49236] [39688] [48796] [31078] [281] [9485] [42389]

Comment miner du Bitctoin avec son pc ?

logiciel de minage (4€ offert avec mon lien) :https://computta.com/?ref=247516 Site pour mettre stocker ses bitcoin ou vendre/acheter ( 10€ offert avec mon l... (L'offre la plus sécurisé pour conserver ses bitcoins,Eth,xmr,etc) Lien affilié pour acheter des Bitcoin avec sa Carte Bleu (Vous gagner 8 € pour 100 euros acheté ) : Gagner de l'argent en faisant miner son PC, Tuto Minergate ... 4 machines pour miner du Bitcoin en 2020 - Duration: 11:53. Monsieur-TK 4,960 views. 11:53. 4 machines pour miner des cryptos en 2020 ... Start trading Bitcoin and cryptocurrency here: http://bit.ly/2Vptr2X IMPORTANT!! This method only illustrates how mining works. You will not make any money f... What it really takes to mine a Bitcoin in 10 Minutes. Firstly I'll show you a special free method to mine Bitcoin and send funds directly to your wallet in 1...

#